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"We are at a societal turning point when it comes to sexual misconduct in the workplace. As we see, and will continue to see, prominent men and women stepping forward with their stories of harassment, assault, and abuse of power, please consider entrusting me with your own. I have spent years fighting on behalf of large corporations and will put that knowledge and skill set to work on your behalf. Whether as a counselor, a confidential sounding board, or an attorney fighting for you in administrative and court proceedings, rest assured your experience will be taken seriously by myself and my office. We can find a solution, together."

It occurs to me that a more positive, not-everything-is-bad post is in order. My past posts have addressed the employee-employer imbalance of power, advocated an end to mandatory arbitration, and criticized the Senate version of the proposed, revised Congressional Accountability Act. However, progress has nonetheless been made these past months (at least I think so)

As the #metoo movement continues to ripple through our society, public and private companies are scrambling to update their sexual harassment policies.

Our Lawmakers didn’t want to be left out of the we-hear-you lovefest and, this February, passed what many observers consider a wide-ranging revision of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 Reform Act. The

De todas las ventajas que los empleadores tienen sobre las víctimas de acoso sexual laboral, quizás ninguna de ellas se iguala al poder que tienen los empleadores a obligar a los empleados que son víctimas de acoso sexual, a someterse al arbitraje y renuciar al derecho que tienen de presentar una demanda, ya sea en

So, the last time I discussed the 15 Key Steps employers should take, according to AllBusiness.com, to respond to sexual harassment claims, I mentioned “lawyering up” and being “fair” (as well as, perhaps more importantly, “appearing fair.”)

Minimizing access to information

I want to pick up with one theme I briefly touched upon

If you want to get a flavor for how employers around the country are responding to the #metoo movement, with its accompanying increase in reported incidents of sexual harassment at work, look no further than these 15 steps provided by an employment attorney to AllBusiness.com

To be fair, some of these steps (if performed in