The #MeToo movement has brought many things to light over the last year along with a lot of questions about what is considered sexual harassment and what to do about it. If you are interested in learning more about these issues, Lapin & Leichtling, LLP will be hosting a Lunch & Learn on March 19,

It occurs to me that a more positive, not-everything-is-bad post is in order. My past posts have addressed the employee-employer imbalance of power, advocated an end to mandatory arbitration, and criticized the Senate version of the proposed, revised Congressional Accountability Act. However, progress has nonetheless been made these past months (at least I think so)

On June 25, 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit issued its opinion in Wilcox v. Corrections Corporation of America in favor of the employer in a Title VII sexual harassment claim. The 11th Circuit affirmed the district court’s granting of the employer’s Rule 50 Motion for Judgment as a Matter

You may have a situation where not only you have been the victim of sexual harassment in the workplace, but your coworkers may also have had other negative experiences with the same employer. Can all of you jointly sue the employer for workplace sexual harassment in what is called a class action or collective action?

So, the last time I discussed the 15 Key Steps employers should take, according to AllBusiness.com, to respond to sexual harassment claims, I mentioned “lawyering up” and being “fair” (as well as, perhaps more importantly, “appearing fair.”)

Minimizing access to information

I want to pick up with one theme I briefly touched upon

If you want to get a flavor for how employers around the country are responding to the #metoo movement, with its accompanying increase in reported incidents of sexual harassment at work, look no further than these 15 steps provided by an employment attorney to AllBusiness.com

To be fair, some of these steps (if performed in